How To Tie A Knot with Fishing Wire

How would you describe a sliding knot? Is it a type of knot or a technique?

Sliding knots are a versatile way to secure a rope or line. They allow you to adjust the tension without having to untie them.

How To Tie A Sliding Knot
How To Tie A Knot with Fishing Wire

This makes them useful for tying things together, such as lashing items to a boat or securing cargo to a truck bed.

A sliding knot is a simple knot that uses two loops. The loop at the top goes over the bottom loop, then back through itself. When tightened, the bottom loop slides down the top loop.

What Is A Sliding Knot Used For?

The most common use for a sliding knot is to make a bowline. Bowlines can be used to lash an object to another one, or they can be used to attach a rope to something else.

Sliding knots can also be used to create a figure eight and other types of knots.

How To Tie A Knot with Fishing Wire

Now, it’s time to get stuck in. So keep reading to learn how to tie a sliding knot. 

STEP ONE

Make a loop in your rope by wrapping it around your hand twice. You should have a loop on each side of your palm.

STEP TWO

Bring the ends of the rope up next to each other so that there’s enough slack between them to form a loop.

STEP THREE

Take the left end of the rope, pass it under the right end, and then bring it up and over the left end. Pull both ropes taut.

STEP FOUR

Pass the left end of the ropes through the loop formed when you pulled the ropes taut.

STEP FIVE

Tighten the knot by pulling the ropes apart until the knot forms a circle. Once the knot has formed into a circle, pull the ropes apart again to tighten it up even more.

Tighten this loop until the rope comes out of the middle of the loop.

STEP SIX

Pull the ropes apart again and repeat steps three and four. Continue tightening the loop until the rope comes all the way out of the loop.

Tighten the knot by pulling the ropes apart, sliding the bottom loop down the top loop until the knot is tight.

The Sliding Snell Knot

Another popular sliding knot is called the sliding snell. It works like a regular sliding knot but has a different shape.

To tie a sliding snell, follow these steps:

STEP 1

Make a loop in the rope by wrapping it around the index finger of your dominant hand.

STEP 2

Bring the ends of the rope together and wrap them around each other.

STEP 3

Take the left end of the wrapped rope and pull it through the loop made in step 1.

STEP 4

Repeat steps 2 and 3 with the right end of the rope.

STEP 5

Continue doing this until the rope forms a circle.

STEP 6

Pull the ropes apart to tighten the knot.

STEP 7

Use your thumb to push the knot into place.

STEP 8

Pull the ropes apart until the knot is snug.

STEP 9

Use your thumb to hold the knot in place while you slide the loop down the rest of the rope. Then tighten the knot by pulling the ropes apart.

STEP 10

When finished, cut off any excess rope.

How Do I Tie A Bowline Knot?

How Do I Tie A Bowline Knot
How To Tie A Knot with Fishing Wire

Another popular sliding knot is the bowline knot. This is a great knot to use when lashing objects together. Here’s how to tie a bowline knot:

STEP 1

Start by making a loop in your rope.

STEP 2 

Bring the ends of your rope together and wrap them tightly around each other.

STEP 3

Pull the ends of the rope apart.

STEP 4

Keep pulling the rope apart until it forms a ring.

STEP 5

Pull the rope through the center of the ring.

STEP 6

Slide the loop down the rope until it reaches the base of the loop.

STEP 7

Pull the loop down the rope.

STEP 8

Tighten the bowline knot by pulling the ropes together.

STEP 9

Cut off any excess rope.

Tips & Tricks

How Do I Know If My Knot Is Tight?

If you’re using a sliding knot to lash something to something else, chances are you’ll want to make sure that the knot is very tight.

If you’re using a sliding snell knot to lash something to someone else, you may not need to worry about making the knot as tight as possible.

What If I Have An Extra Piece Of Rope? Can I Just Keep Adding Knots To The Rope?

Yes! You can add more knots to your rope without worrying about running out. Just be careful to keep track of which knot goes where.

For example, you could start with one knot on the outside of the object being lashed to another object, two knots inside the first knot, three knots inside those two knots, etc.

Can I Use A Sliding Knot For Anything?

Sure! Sliding knots work well for many things. They’re especially useful for tying up items that don’t require much strength or tension.

For example, you might use a sliding knot to tie up a bag of groceries, a package, or even a sleeping bag.

You can also use a sliding knot to secure a tarp to a tent pole, a boat sail to a mast, and, of course, for fishing.

Final Thoughts

The most important thing to remember when using a sliding knot is to pay attention to what happens when you pull the ropes apart.

For example, if the knot slides easily along the rope, then you’ve tied a good sliding knot.

If the knot doesn’t move at all, then you probably have an overhand knot instead of a sliding knot.

If you’ve been curious about learning how to tie sliding knots, we hope we’ve shown you how easy it is to do.

This is one of the most versatile knots you can use, so it’s a great one to add to your collection!

And once you’ve got the process down with a rope, you’ll be ready to try it with more fiddly mediums such as fishing line. 

Fishing Pro at Tyger Leader
My name is Jacob Beasley and I want to be a leader for young fishermen and women who need their questions answered.

While I don’t mind having people walk up to me and ask me about fishing, it does violate an unspoken rule of fishing - leave each other alone. You might scare off my fish by walking over to me!

Also, I wanted to create a single space where newbies could come and read up for hours so that they head to their fishing spot confident and ready. You don’t want to be hovering over your phone all day trying to get answers to your questions.

So, stay and learn for a while. I hope that by the next time you go fishing, something you read on Tyger Leader will be of use.
Jacob Beasley
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